Hamilton-Lauraville

With its large Victorian homes, colonials and bungalows, the Hamilton-Lauraville communities of Lauraville, Arcadia, Moravia-Walther, Waltherson and Hamilton Hills are a home for those looking for urban convenience and suburban amenities. These communities feature leafy blocks and backyards; yet, the proximity to the shops of the Lauraville business district offer urbanites the amenities of city life. This growing community of local entrepreneurs offers fine dining, a book store, coffee shop, children’s entertainment, home decorating and many other goods and services. Red Canoe Bookstore Café sells books for children and adults and coffee, tea, food and other treats. Maggie’s Farm is a neighborhood restaurant with locally-sourced food. And whether you’re looking for a parochial, public charter or traditional public school, the neighborhoods of Greater Lauraville have superior options as the home to Hamilton Elementary/Middle, St. Francis of Assisi and City Neighborhors Public Charter Schools.

Lauraville began to take on the appearance of a village in the decade proceeding the Civil War. Prior to 1852, a school house was built for the children of mill workers and farmers, near the corner of Gordon Lane and Weitzel Avenue. Churches were also built to serve the pre-Civil War Lauraville community. These included the original Eutaw Methodist Church, which was built in 1860 on a hill overlooking the Herring Run, and the older St. Andrews Chapel, which was located just east of Lauraville along today’s Cold Spring Lane.

Soon after the Civil War, Lauraville became an official village, with its own post office, and as a result its present name. Local residents who had lobbied for a local mail service discovered that the Post Office required a village name. At a local meeting, chief supporter for the village post office, John Henry Keene, a local property owner who also operated a planing mill and lumber yard on the site of today’s Bond Lumber, suggested that the community be named after his daughter Laura.

By 1918, when most of Lauraville was annexed to Baltimore City, many houses had already been built. Because Lauraville was built up over a period of years by various developers, most of the houses are detached, single family frame or cedar shingle structures. The Lauraville neighborhood benefits from irregular street patterns and from the considerable number of shade trees.

Lauraville began to take on the appearance of a village in the decade proceeding the Civil War. Prior to 1852, a school house was built for the children of mill workers and farmers, near the corner of Gordon Lane and Weitzel Avenue. Churches were also built to serve the pre-Civil War Lauraville community. These included the original Eutaw Methodist Church, which was built in 1860 on a hill overlooking the Herring Run, and the older St. Andrews Chapel, which was located just east of Lauraville along today’s Cold Spring Lane.

Soon after the Civil War, Lauraville became an official village, with its own post office, and as a result its present name. Local residents who had lobbied for a local mail service discovered that the Post Office required a village name. At a local meeting, chief supporter for the village post office, John Henry Keene, a local property owner who also operated a planing mill and lumber yard on the site of today’s Bond Lumber, suggested that the community be named after his daughter Laura.

By 1918, when most of Lauraville was annexed to Baltimore City, many houses had already been built. Because Lauraville was built up over a period of years by various developers, most of the houses are detached, single family frame or cedar shingle structures. The Lauraville neighborhood benefits from irregular street patterns and from the considerable number of shade trees.